OpenLibra

OpenLibra. The free online library that you have waiting for
  1. XKCD Volume 0
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    Author: Randall Munroe
    Year: 2009
    Publisher: Breadpig
    Pages: 118
    Size: 135.92 Mbs (pdf)
    Language: english

    This book is a collection of strips from xkcd, a free webcomic. I want to get that out of the way so you don't feel betrayed later when you realize you paid for a book of things that you could get for free on the Internet. I like books a lot, so I've put this one together from my webcomic (and added some annotations and other tidbits), but that's really no excuse for poor economic sense on your part. Still, if you've purchased this book, I suppose it's too late for regrets. Let's gloss over this incident and move on to the story of xkcd. I remember thinking, sometime around age ten, that being a cartoonist must be wonderful. You get to draw things, people think you're clever, you can do your work whenever you want, and you can hang around at home all day in your underwear. But I had two problems: I couldn't draw and I didn't know how to write jokes. With that career choice obviously out of reach, I went for my second choice: awkward science nerd.

  2. Problems in Introductory Physics
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    Author: Benjamin Crowell & B. Shotwell
    Year: 2016
    Publisher: Autoedición
    Pages: 208
    Size: 10.88 Mbs (pdf)
    Language: english

    This book is a collection of homework problems for use in an introductory physics course. It is a work in progress, currently complete through mechanics and electromagnetism. There is a complete set of ancillary materials, including solutions and an online answer checker. If you're an instructor, you can use these problems as a plug-in replacement for the ones in a commercial textbook, thus insulating yourself from common hassles associated with using the problems from a commercial text. For example, you can change books without having to redo all your problem sets, or you can tell your students that they can use any edition of a particular text.

  3. Data Science at the Command Line
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    Author: Jeroen Janssens
    Year: 2014
    Publisher: O'Reilly
    Pages: 212
    Size: 7.78 Mbs (zip)
    Language: english

    Data science is an exciting field to work in. It’s also still very young. Unfortunately, many people, and especially companies, believe that you need new technology in order to tackle the problems posed by data science. However, as this book demonstrates, many things can be accomplished by using the command line instead, and sometimes in a much more efficient way. Around five years ago, during my PhD program, I gradually switched from using Microsoft Windows to GNU/Linux. Because it was a bit scary at first, I started with having both operating systems installed next to each other (known as dual-boot). The urge to switch back and forth between the two faded and at some point I was even tinkering around with Arch Linux, which allows you to build up your own custom operating system from scratch. All you’re given is the command line, and it’s up to you what you want to make of it. Out of necessity I quickly became comfortable using the command line. Eventually, as spare time got more precious, I settled down with a GNU/Linux distribution known as Ubuntu because of its easy-of-use and large community. Nevertheless, the command line is still where I’m getting most of my work done. It actually hasn’t been too long ago that I realized that the command line is not just for installing software, system configuration, and searching files. I started learning about command-line tools such as cut, sort, and sed. These are examples of command-line tools that take data as input, do something to it, and print the result. Ubuntu comes with quite a few of them. Once I understood the potential of combining these small tools, I was hooked. The book has been licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

  4. RubyFu
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    Author: Varios
    Year: 2017
    Publisher: Autoedición
    Pages: 281
    Size: 3.45 Mbs (pdf)
    Language: english

    This book is a great collection of ideas, tricks, and skills that could be useful for Hackers. It's a unique extraction reference, summarizes a lot of research and experience in order to achieve your w00t in the shortest and smartest way. Rubyfu is where you'll find plug-n-hack code. Rubyfu is a book to use not only to read, it's where ruby goes evil. Who should read this book? Ideally, Hackers! Those who have enough experience to hack our world and have at least basics in the Ruby programming language. To get the best benefits of the book, open Rubyfu.net and pin its browser tab. Use the irb/pry interactive interpreter to run the code, or run it as a script. Enhance the code to fit your needs and yeah, tweet the code and its output to @Rubyfu to share it with our awesome community.

  5. Matrix Analysis and Algorithms
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    Author: Andrew Stuart & Jochen Voss
    Year: 2009
    Publisher: Autoedición
    Pages: 108
    Size: 796 Kbs (pdf)
    Language: english

    The book contains an introduction to matrix analysis, and to the basic algorithms of numerical linear algebra. Further results can be found in many text books. The book of Horn and Johnson is an excellent reference for theoretical results about matrix analysis. The subject of linear algebra, and matrix analysis in particular, is treated in an original and illuminating fashion in [Lax97]. For a general introduction to the subject of numerical linear algebra we recommend the book by Trefethen and Bau; more theoretical treatments of the subject can be found in Demmel, Golub and Van Loan and in Stoer and Bulirsch. Higham's book contains a wealth of information about stability and the effect of rounding errors in numerical algorithms; it is this source that we used for almost all theorems we state concerning backward error analysis. The book of Saad covers the subject of iterative methods for linear systems. The symmetric eigenvalue problem is analysed in Parlett.